News

Western United States swelters amid deadly heat

Western United States swelters amid deadly heat

Photo: Reuters

PHOENIX (Reuters) – A dangerous, record-breaking heat wave in the western United States contributed to the death of a Nevada resident and sent scores of people to hospitals with heat-related illnesses.

The scorching heat, caused by a dome of hot air trapped by a high pressure ridge, pushed the mercury above 100 F (38 C) in parts of California, Arizona, Idaho, Colorado, Nevada and Utah and Texas.

Paramedics in Las Vegas, where searing temperatures reached an all-time high of 118 F (48 C) on Saturday, found an elderly man dead in his apartment, which had no air-conditioning.

The unidentified man had prior medical issues and “either the heat got to him or the medical condition was aggravated by the heat,” Las Vegas Fire & Rescue spokesman Tim Szymanski said.

Scores of other people were treated for heat-related symptoms, including a man who pulled off a Nevada highway and called 911 to say he felt ill after driving for several hours without air-conditioning. He was hospitalized in serious condition with heat stroke, Szymanski said.

Cities and towns across the sun-scorched western United States opened air-conditioned “cooling centers” in community centers, homeless shelters and libraries, and warned residents to avoid prolonged exposure to the high temperatures.

“It’s like when you open up the door to your oven and you get that blast of hot air. That’s kind of what it feels like outside,” said Charlotte Dewey, a weather service meteorologist in Phoenix, Arizona, where temperatures nudged 114 F (46 C) on Sunday.

“It’s pretty dangerous, even for people who are very acclimated to the weather, to be outside and doing physical activity … we advise everybody to avoid being outdoors,” Dewey added.

In Los Angeles County, many people have been hospitalized or treated for dehydration, exhaustion and heat stroke, a fire department spokesman said.

There were fears that migrants attempting to cross into the United States from Mexico would die in the desert. More border agents were added on the American side, said Brent Cagen, a spokesman for the Tucson sector of the U.S. Border Patrol.

At least three people who attempted to illegally cross the border into Arizona were found dead this week, likely succumbing to the heat, Cagen said.

Firefighters worry about dry conditions, which have ignited several major brush fires across the region recently, and about more blazes ignited by wayward fireworks launched from backyards to commemorate the Fourth of July holiday.

Recent Headlines

in Music

One Direction starts work on first album as a foursome

directionfans

Just days after the departure of Zayn Malik, the remaining members of 1D are back in the studio.

in Entertainment

Easy April Fools’ Day pranks

aprilfools

Looking for a quick and easy way to pull a fast one? Check out these perfect pranks for kids, coworkers, and friends.

in Music

Iggy Azalea stepping behind the camera

iggyazalea

The rapper will direct the music video for her much-anticipated "Pretty Girls" duet with Britney Spears.

in Entertainment

Robin Williams’ image cannot be used for 25 years

Actor and comedian Robin Williams poses during a press tour promoting his new movie "License To Wed" in Santa Monica, Calif., Friday, June 15, 2007.

The "Mrs. Doubtfire" star will not appear in any form of publicity until 2039.

in Music

Music festivals ban ‘selfie sticks’

selfie

You'll just have to have long arms if you're taking a selfie at Coachella or Lollapalooza.